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Mac and Grease, aka Mac ‘n’ Bacon

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

 

 

Cooking bacon

From page 188, Zingerman’s Guide to Better Bacon: Stories of Pork Bellies, Hush Puppies, Rock ‘n’ Roll Music and Bacon Fat Mayonnaise:

Ingredients:

1/2 pound really good macaroni (I swear by the Martelli family’s)
8 ounces sliced bacon (about 4 to 6 slices)(I like Benton’s because the simplicity of the dish gets its full smokiness out front)
Coarse sea salt to taste
Freshly ground Tellicherry black pepper to taste

Procedure:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add lots of salt, then pasta. Stir well.

While the pasta is cooking, fry the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until done. Remove the bacon from the pan, reserving the hot fat in the skillet. Chop the bacon and stand by. As soon as the pasta is almost al dente, drain it well and add it to the skillet along with the bacon. Toss well and cook for another minute or two, so that the grease really cooks into the macaroni. Season with salt and plenty of black pepper to taste. Serve immediately in hot bowls.

Optional additions:

“Enh,” Meg wrote me a day or so after she’d sent the original recipe (the word means “yes”  in Ojibway). “Try the mac and grease with a few big garden tomatoes cut into 1-inch cubes.” It’s incredibly simple—just chunks of really good tomato tossed into the hot bacon fat for a minute or two with some salt before the pasta goes into the skillet. “The tomatoes,” she said, should “get hot but not saucy, if you know what I mean. I did, and I made the dish and it was, again, in its simplicity, really, really good. Of course it’s only worth doing when the tomatoes are in season. The rest of the year you could gussy up your Mac and Grease by tossing in chopped vegetables or greens of most any sort, and cooking until they’re somewhere between soft and golden brown. Thinking more exotically, I want to throw chopped hickory nuts on top, too. You, of course, can do whatever you like. Like most pasta dishes, this one lends itself to hundreds of variations.

Serves 2 as a main course, or 4 as a side dish


It’s Time for Bacon!

Monday, April 1st, 2019

From the book that started it all, Zingerman’s Guide to Better Bacon, we bring you the 10th Annual Camp Bacon!

To celebrate, we’ll be sharing recipes from the book with you. Come see us at Camp and learn more. We hope to see you there!

Wilted Salad

A great all-American dish dating back to the Colonial era, wilted salad uses bacon fat as the basis for a dressing in much the same way that olive oil is used to dress greens in the Mediterranean. The heat of the bacon dressing wilts the greens—hence the name. April McGreger, who grew up with bacon fat as the basis for a lot of her family’s food, told me that they called this “killt lettuce”—because the lettuce is “slain” by the hot fat, not because of any connection to Scottish menswear. The bacon’s flavor is a big part of the dish, so use whatever variety strikes your fancy. Because the fat will solidify once it cools, the dressing must be served warm.

Ingredients:

6 ounces mixed greens, washed and dried

6 ounces sliced bacon (about 3 to 4 slices)

2 scallions (greens and whites), thinly sliced

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

½ teaspoon sugar

Coarse sea salt to taste

2 ounces cheddar cheese, diced (optional)

¼ cup walnuts or hickory nuts, lightly toasted and chopped (optional)

Freshly ground Tellicherry black pepper to taste

 

Procedure:

Place the greens in a large, heat-proof serving bowl.

Fry the bacon in a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium heat until crisp. Remove from the skillet, drain and chop it. Reserve about 4 tablespoons of fat in the skillet (augment with a glug from your backup supply if necessary).

Add the sliced scallions to the pan and cook for a minute. Pour in the cider vinegar, sugar and a pinch of salt. Stir well and boil lightly for a minute.

If you’re using cheese or toasted nuts, distribute them over the greens. Pour the hot dressing over the top, toss well and sprinkle with the bits of cooked bacon and plenty of fresh pepper. Serve warm.

Serves 2 as a main course, or 4 as a side dish

 

 


The Positive Business Conference is Coming Up!

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

Ari will be speaking at the Positive Business Conference this year. We’re excited to be a part of it! Check out more about it here. Want a head start in fixing the energy flow in your office space? Check out Secret 19. Here’s an excerpt for you:

By living the Natural Laws of Business, we were tapping the full energy of the people who work here and getting way better results in the process.

What I’m talking about here is not just some “soft stuff ” to slough off onto your HR department to deal with. Energy is . . . nearly everything. It’s how we feel, how we act, how we approach the world. It is, in essence, the emotional atmosphere in which we operate. Low, negative energy brings trouble. But positive energy brings everything we’re after: innovation, creativity, caring, generosity of spirit, belief, big ideas, and all that extra effort that so often makes the difference between good and great. And that is, very truly, what I believe we’re getting from most everyone who works here.

By contrast, most of the rest of the world is squandering massive amounts of available human energy every day. Pick your analogy—the way they’re working is akin to filling a bucket that has a big hole in the bottom; like running the AC with the windows wide open; or like driving on the highway while you’re still stuck in low gear. (No offense to anyone’s political allegiance, but I can’t figure out how raising or lowering tax rates would have any impact on this problem—it strikes me as being akin to arguing about whether or not to switch the fan from “Auto” to “On” while operating that dang AC with all the windows still wide open.)


“The Art of Business: Why I Want to be an Artist” Has Arrived!

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

The new pamphlet is here and book release events are coming soon!

In the metaphorical organizational ecosystem I made up while I was working on The Power of Beliefs in Business, I started to think of beliefs as the “root system” of our lives; culture quickly became “the soil;” hope, “the sun;” the spirit of generosity, I imagined as “water;” purpose I pictured as “air.” In that context, I started to think about new ideas as “seeds.” (If you’d like to see an illustrated draft of the “organizational ecosystem,” email me at ari(at)zingermans(dot)com.) As with agriculture, if you sow a hundred “seeds”/ideas in your “field,” only a limited number will sprout. Since we can’t know in advance which will sprout, we need to plant far more than we’ll actually get to grow. And then, as patiently as we can, watch carefully for those that start to poke their little green leaves out from the soil. Those are the seeds/ideas that we start to nurture, care for, and let grow into something far greater than the tiny seed from which they started. As in nature, no one has control over the outcomes. We can influence, but we can’t impose.

The subject matter of this new pamphlet is one of the ideas that took root. Over the last few years it’s grown into something significant, a concept that I reference regularly when I teach, write, and work. And, really, in every aspect of my life. As you’ll read in the pamphlet, the original idea came to me while I was working on another part of The Power of Beliefs. Eventually, it ended up in the epilogue. But the more I played with it, the more the idea grew. What started as a small seed has evolved into the base of a business and life philosophy.

The Art of Business includes, first, the epilogue from Part 4 of the book. It’s followed by further thoughts; an interview in which I explain what was on my mind on the subject. In the spirit of what I’m writing about, what artist and author Robert Henri called “the Art Spirit,” we’ve worked to make the physical form of the piece particularly special—as unique, creative, art-focused and fun as what I’ve been imagining this approach to business and life would look like in real life.

The cover is letterpress-printed by Michael Coughlin of Letterpress Book Publishing in Minneapolis with care. Mike’s calm, grounded energy, his anarchist beliefs, his passion for old-time printing methods and the beauty of the books he puts out resonate strongly with me.

The beautiful scratchboard illustration on the inside page of the pamphlet is done by our own Ian Nagy. The t-shirt you’ll see in the drawing displays the painting of Patrick-Earl Barnes. I met Patrick-Earl on the street in Soho, in NYC, about 14 years ago and fell in love with his art. I have about 15 of his pieces hanging in my house.

Thanks to everyone who works in the ZCoB, and all of you—our customers and suppliers— for giving me the chance to live and work and learn in such an inspiring, supportive, collaborative, and artistically oriented ecosystem! As Enrique Martínez Celaya says, “A great work of art cannot come from hatred or cynicism…At the heart of great art you will find love and compassion.” I feel very fortunate to be part of ours!

The pamphlet is out NOW at the Deli, Roadhouse, Coffee Company, Zingtrain.com, and here at Zingerman’s Press. And, to add to the mix, we’ve got a few artful kickoff events coming up:

  • Thursday, November 22 (that’s right, Thanksgiving Day), at Fumbally Café in Dublin! (yes, Dublin, Ireland, not Dublin, Ohio!). Info.
  • Friday November 30, early in the morning, at the Roadhouse (we’ll serve Zingerman’s Coffee Company’s Holiday Blend). Info.
  • Wednesday evening December 5 at ZingTrain. Info.

Corporate Rebels Guest Blogger: Ari Weinzweig

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

ariHiya! Our friends at Corporate Rebels invited Ari to join them as a guest blogger recently. Ari shares his thoughts about good work versus bad work from Part 2 of our leadership series, and shares one of his favorite quotes from author and writing inspiration Brenda Ueland:

You have talent, are original, and have something important to say.

It is good to work. Work with love and like it when you do it.

It is a privilege to get to do this.

Be Bold, Be Free, Be Truthful.

Check it out!

 


The “Secret” Pamphlets Are Here!

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

photo 1 (4)The first anarchist pamphlet that I held came to me in a protective sleeve—modern airtight cello shelter for the pages within. Ari had brought it in for me to see. He was thrilled to be sharing an experience such as this. His enthusiasm was palpable. He handled it with care: “Are your hands clean? Better wash them to be sure…” There was a simple title pressed into the cover page—a fragile fold of blue paper, age-worn at the edges. Made before Roosevelt took up a public voice for the common man. I carefully opened the cover and saw a hand-laid image on the first page. I continued a giddy awe-filled journey through the pages of letter-pressed type and carved and stamped pictures. The time it took to create one page was certainly not the point and scroll and click of today’s modern publications. This pamphlet carried with it a message of time and care and belief in creating something that could be felt on a spiritual level of appreciation. Not only for the message, but how it travels to the reader. We’ve had these pamphlets in mind as we work to create those that we bring to you through Zingerman’s Press. Each one will be a little different, and each one will have spent some time in our hands before they make it to yours. Enjoy! Jenny